Clement Middle School Home Page
« March 2017 »
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
26
27
28
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

 

All 7th Grade Students Must Have Proof Of TDap Shot To Begin School on August 10, 2016.
Al hacer clic en la bandera en la parte inferior de esta página se traducirá este sitio web al español
New immunization requirements for the 2016-2017 school year/SB 277:áAll incoming Kindergarten and 7thágrade students must have current immunizations on record to begin school on August 10, 2016.áCalifornia law SB 277 no longer allows personal or religious beliefs exemptions. Clickáhere for more information.
CURRENT 6th Grade Students Must Have Proof Of Whooping Cough Immunization. Please submit proof of shot to school office by March 27, 2017
View Profile

Jennifer Krogman

Jennifer Krogman's Multimedia Blog

May 2009

Blog EntryBlog: Monday, May 18, 2009

Seeing things our way

People all the view in different ways. Four different people may view the same event at the same time and come to four different conclusions as to what just happened and why it happened.  One reason for the different interpretations of an event is bias.  Bias is the condition where a person is predisposed to see something in a certain way.  It may be that the person likes a certain color, type of clothing, sport, or even type of car.  All of these could cause us to be biased in one way or another.

 

Many times when people have a bias they do not even realize that it exists.  It is often necessary to point out a bias to a person before they start to realize that they have that bias.  This is because when we are biased in some way we often will ignore evidence that goes against the bias.  For example a person who really likes basketball might ignore a report on the physical conditioning that is required for ballet dancing.  Then that same person might see a report later on  that says that basketball players run more than other sports athletes and they say “There, you see, that proves that basketball is the best sport.”

 

Some of the strongest evidence of bias takes place in our news.  The newspapers, television news stations, and radio news are supposed to just report the facts and not put in their opinion.  Yet when you see and hear news stories from multiple sources you often get different impressions of what is going on.  In order to detect bias it is important that individuals listen and read very carefully the way a story is being reported.  If bias is trying to be used the writer or reporter will often use complimentary words if they want to favor the story and demeaning words if they want to show a negative side to the story. 

 

Political campaigns and advertising are other places that you see bias.  Obviously a political candidate is going to use information and words which put him or her in the best possible light.  The same goes for a product.  You are only going to see the positive aspects of the product and not the negative aspects in an advertisement. When this is done in the extreme it is often called propaganda and propaganda has been used throughout history.

 

How do you see bias when you read your local newspaper?  Is it ever possible for a news source to be completely unbiased?  What are examples of bias that you see and hear when you watch television?  How can bias be used in a positive way as well as in a negative way?

0 comments
Blog EntryBlog: Monday, May 4, 2009

Significantly Fast

Haile Gebrselassie or Ethiopia holds the world record for the fastest marathon at 2 hours, 4 minutes and 26 seconds.  A marathon is a long-distance running event which became one of the modern Olympic events in 1896.



Haile Gebrselassie

 

A modern marathon is a distance of exactly 42.195 kilometers or 26 miles, 385 yards.  In the US customary system this is rounded to 26.22 miles.  The difference between the metric measurement and the rounded customary measurement is just over 2 meters.

 

So how fast did Haile Gebrselassie run each mile?  If we convert his time into minutes we get 124.43 minutes (26 seconds/60 seconds = .43 minutes).  You then need to divide that number by 26.22 miles.  When I plug this equation in to my calculator, I find that Mr. Gebrselassie ran each mile in 4.745614 minutes!!  I don’t know about you, but I couldn’t even begin to run one mile in that time, much less 26 of them!

 

My question is this, how should the 4.745614 minutes be rounded?  How many digits are significant or make sense to include?  Explain.  There is a rule for “significant digits”’ what do you think it is?

0 comments
Podcast
The podcast feed will be available after the first podcast is uploaded.
Why Blog?
Blogging enables a teacher to post topics that students discuss after class.

A Tip for Students
Gain merit points by participating in the discussion forum after you have read the blog post.
Archives
Site Map | Privacy Policy | View "printer-friendly" page | Login   In Japanese  In Korean  En français  Auf Deutsch  In italiano   No português  En español  In Russian  
Site powered by SchoolFusion.com © 2017 - Educational website content management